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5 Things College Students Should Know Before Adopting a Dog

Generally speaking, college requires a lot more effort from students than high school. Once you begin your college career, you will see that students are more motivated, professors are more demanding, and the workload is a lot more difficult. These academic standards are even more visible in graduate school. Now, although college is filled with adventurous opportunities, it can also be filled with stress. In other words, as a result of everything going on, it’s more common for college students to experience higher levels of stress related to school, work, finance, and in some cases, relationships.

Researchers have recently discovered that, therapy dogs can decrease stress in humans. This means that social interactions with animals is the key to reduce stress levels. For college students, this might seem like an easy issue to resolve. You might be thinking, “Since I’m stressed, I can just adopt a dog and everything will be okay.” However, taking care of an animal, especially when you’re in college isn’t as easy as it sounds.

So before you consider running to the animal shelter, here are five things you should know before adopting a dog.



Here are five things students should be aware of before adopting a dog.

1. Dogs Aren’t Toys

The best part about having a dog is they’re always right by your side no matter what. If you get a bad grade on an exam, get into an argument with your friend, or just having one of those when nothing seems to be going right. Your dog will always be there for you. In order to avoid putting yourself and your new best friend in a bad situation, it’s always a good idea to over your financial records. To put it differently, make sure you can afford to take care of a dog and cover all of the expenses that comes with it. According to RaisingSpot.com, the yearly cost of having a dog can range anywhere from $360 to $2,520 or more in some cases.

2. Check Your Financial Records

The best part about having a dog is they’re always right by your side no matter what. If you get a bad grade on an exam, get into an argument with your friend, or just having one of those when nothing seems to be going right. Your dog will always be there for you. In order to avoid putting yourself and your new best friend in a bad situation, it’s always a good idea to over your financial records. To put it differently, make sure you can afford to take care of a dog and cover all of the expenses that comes with it. According to RaisingSpot.com , the yearly cost of having a dog can range anywhere from $360 to $2,520 or more in some cases.

Although having a dog is a great addition to college life, it can also be expensive, causing you, the owner, to stress out even more.



3. Build A Relationship With The Animal Shelter You’re Looking To Adopt From

Before choosing a shelter dog, it’s always a good idea to visit local animal shelters near you. This will help you decide whether or not you want to adopt from them, and it will also give you the opportunity to learn about some of the shelter's policies. Since every shelter has different policies, it’s important for you to know them. Some policies may discuss the type of dogs the shelter normally receives, and might even talk about specific breeds suitable for college students. The only way to find out, however, is by doing the research yourself.

If you find a shelter you like, ask questions to the staff members, and make sure you access the dog by spending as much time as possible with him/her. That way you can determine if the animal is people-friendly and see if the animal is playful.

First things first, before adopting a dog, make sure you feel comfortable in the shelter.



4. It’s A Life Lifelong Commitment

As a former college student, the most exciting day to look forward to is graduation. The day is filled with celebrations, hugs, and lots of cards from loved ones. What students often times don’t think about though, is stepping out into the real world and adjusting to a new life. For some, this is the moment they realize that they no longer have time to take care of a dog. This might result in the animal being returned to the shelter and left to fend for itself.

To avoid breaking a dog’s heart and putting them in a hostile environment, ask yourself beforehand, “Do I have the time to take care of a dog?”

If the answer is “no,” or “I’m not sure,” it doesn’t necessarily mean you can never own a dog, it just means now may not be the time to consider adopting a pet. But if you do decide to adopt a dog, remember, dogs are forever and shouldn’t be abandoned so prepare for a lifestyle change.





5. Moving Across States With Your Best Friend

So you’ve graduated from college, adopted a dog, and now you’re relocating to a new place with your best friend. Well, let me be the first to say, congratulations on your accomplishments. Whether you’re moving back home to live with your parents again, or moving to a new location, it’s a big deal of course for both you and your dog. It gives both of you an opportunity to explore a new environment, but it also gives both of you, the ability to learn about it as well. Now, although you may get adjusted to the new surroundings at a relatively fast pace, your furry friend, however, might take a little bit longer to do so. Remember, this is a new environment for them, so they may need more time to adjust to their new habitat.

Tips For Moving Day

Moving to begin with, is never a fun activity. It’s tiresome, expensive, and at times, complicated. Especially if you are preparing for a long distance move. If you aren’t prepared, this process could take a lot longer than expected for both you and your dog. In order to avoid wasting a lot of time on the move make a checklist for yourself! This will allow you to keep everything in order and it will also help you keep track of your valuables. From the dog's point of view, it will help make the transition as smooth as possible while helping the dog remain stress free.

It’s also a good idea to check for dog friendly locations near your new home, and make sure you have all of your dog’s belongs packed. The only thing left to do now is, going outside and having fun with your new best friend.


Growing up Cody loved reading, and exploring the wilderness to get out the house. Throughout his childhood, Cody always managed to get his hands on books and loved playing with animals. Now, as an adult, books are still a part of Cody’s life and he loves reading them.








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