If you ever thought your pet deserves to be in Hollywood, you’ve definitely had the opportunity to watch how it’s done. Hollywood has used pet actors and actresses for as long as its existence. In years past, Disney has dominated animated pet movies for years. Disney's success combines family fun with pets to form blockbusters in the box office.

1. Old Yeller (1957)
When it comes to films about a boy and his dog, Old Yeller reigns supreme as the top choice. Considered an important cultural film for baby boomers, Old Yeller has one of the most memorable scenes in the history of pet cinema.



2. Babe (1995)
Dog, cat, pig? Babe goes against the wave of traditional pet films as the title and star is a pig who wants to become a sheep dog. Babe faces numerous obstacles to become a sheep dog as the majority of sheep dogs on the farm are Border Collies. Babe isn’t the only pig to be featured in Hollywood, yet it’s very unlikely that we will see a trend in owning pigs.




3. One Hundred and One Dalmations (1961)
Not only do Dalmatians make great fire station dogs, they’re quite the diligent parents according to this classic 1961 animated Disney film. The Dalmatian parents, Pongo and Perdita, battle the villainous Cruella de Vil to ensure the safety of their puppies as well as others taken captive by de Vil.



4. Finding Nemo (2003)
Of all types of pet owners, fish hobbyists are the most likely to own more than one. Finding Nemo was included on this list to satisfy the fish owners out there. Pixar’s amazing animation and brilliant voice-cast headline this heartfelt film about a father Clownfish searching for his son. One day, if you were to walk into a fish store that sells saltwater fish, don’t be surprised to hear a child exclaim, “Nemo, Nemo!”




5. Beethoven (1992)
If you’re expecting the German composer and pianist, you’ve come to the wrong place. Beethoven is the title and star of the 1992 family film about a St. Bernard who shares a unique bond with his loving family. The family quickly learns that a small St. Bernard puppy eventually grows to be full-grown 185 pound gargantuan dog.





6. The Black Stallion (1979)
Executive producer Francis Ford Coppola and supporting actor Mickey Rooney headline the film, The Black Stallion. Based on the 1941 children’s novel, Black Stallion is the story of Alec Ramsey, who is shipwrecked with a wild Arabian stallion on a deserted island. After the two are rescued, they are determined to enter a race challenging two champion race horses.




7. Homeward Bound(1993)
Many of us enjoy a nice, relaxing road trip from time to time. The same could not be said for trio of Shadow (Golden Retriever), Chance (American Bulldog) and Sassy (Himalayan Cat). The group journey’s from Oregon to San Francisco involves numerous obstacles as they try to return home to their family. If you’ve never seen dogs and cats bond comedically, this film is your chance to see it in action.



8. My Dog Skip (2000)
Based on Willie Morris' autobiography, My Dog Skip is about the strong bond between Willie, a young boy growing up his Jack Russell Terrier, Skip. Willie looks back upon his life realizing that Skip led him through the best parts of his life, creating numerous friendships that include his girlfriend, Rivers. The tagline summarizes this film as, “Every family needs an optimist.”



9. Lady and the Tramp (1955)
Enormously successful at the box office, Lady and The Tramp is one of the many classic films Disney produced in the 20th century. The story displays the love that a female American Cocker Spaniel named Lady develops with a male stray mutt named Tramp. The film contains the classic scene where Lady and Tramp share a kiss while eating spaghetti and meatballs.





10. Best in Show (2000)
Many of the previous films aforementioned involve stories of bonding relationships between pets and owners. Best in Show is the complete opposite as this untraditional mockumentary focuses on how particular owners and handlers interact as they travel to a prestigious dog show to compete. The film spoofs dog owners with a quirky sense of humor and dialogue that was mostly improvised.